Can You Spot Fake News?

person reading the daily fake news newspaper sitting on gray couch
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Fake news is everywhere, it seems. Such chicanery succeeds because many of us don’t have tools to help us tell the difference. Peter Facione, in his article “Ten Ways To Spot Fake News,” outlines a Credibility Test, consisting of 10 yes/no questions that can signal a dubious source. I am abbreviating his ideas here, but you can find the article on his blog: https://www.insightassessment.com/BLOG/Ten-Ways-to-Spot-Fake-News.Continue reading “Can You Spot Fake News?”

My book is out!

Critical Thinking Now: Practical Teaching Methods for Classrooms around the World

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Today’s curricula can (and should) incorporate critical thinking methods because they are the means by which people best understand, learn, and retain higher level concepts. Contrary to what many professional trainers assume, teaching critical thinking is not achieved by shoveling facts at an audience through lecturing or multiple choice testing. It requires sustained, finely tuned teaching and assessment methods. This book lays out a blueprint to do just that. Specifically, it outlines the necessary components of a critical thinking classroom and provides assessment techniques and ample exercises adaptable to any student’s field, age, or level of education.
Often not considered are those learners schooled in a non-Western culture and not proficient in the presenter’s language. These audiences can create invisible barriers to instruction. Without understanding these pitfalls, trainers invite frustration and failure, and risk wasting everyone’s time and money because they were unaware any problem existed. The book addresses these linguistic, cultural, and cognitive obstacles and suggests several solutions, whether you teach these students on your home turf or theirs.

Click Rowman & Littlefield for more information. Happy critical thinking!

 

 

Think they understand? Ask ’em.

person-thinking-with-question-mark
Ask questions you don’t know the answer to so you can find out what they know.

 

Quizzes and tests are time-honored methods of finding out about student learning beyond what you think they know. But there is a quicker, informal, non-graded way to do that by asking them. Although it could be done every class session, I do it after I teach a certain skill and always at midterm so I can refine my teaching.  I give them half sheets of paper and ask to tell me:Continue reading “Think they understand? Ask ’em.”

Still Questioning!

A wonderful article about questions: what to ask and why they’re important. No one mentions critical thinking. That’s OK. You and I still know asking why is the engine behind most of it.

From Edutopia

Edutopia

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students by Rebecca Alber

Still Questioning!

 

 

 

Foundation for Critical Thinking Offers Certification in Paul-Elder Method

The Foundation for Critical Thinking is offering certification in its method for understanding and teaching critical thinking. I’ve attended and presented at several of its conferences and think it’s really necessary to see how the method in action to really understand how to do it. It’s billed as an approach to reason through a problem or issue, applicable to any field–business, academia, life, etc. (as any method should be).Continue reading “Foundation for Critical Thinking Offers Certification in Paul-Elder Method”

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